Saturday, September 16, 2017

SIGTTO (Society of International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators) Guidlines Personal Handbook

Personal Handbook
Guide to Safety Rules, Regulations
and Familiarisation on Board –
a ‘Cabin LSA Handbook’




“Safety does not merely happen; it is the reward of good management, good housekeeping and good procedures”
 

Take care of this booklet while you are on board.
This booklet belongs in your cabin.
Upon request to your senior Officer, you may take it with you when signing off the vessel.

SIGTTO offers the draft below as one way in which a Company can produce an LSA Handbook to be issued to all crew and placed in their cabins. The draft covers items which SIGTTO believes should be addressed.  SIGTTO also recognises that individual Companies and Flag Administrations may have alternative ways to achieve this objective with their approved ISM systems.

SIGTTO Information Paper No. 20

Society of International Gas Tanker and Terminal Operators


Personal – Safety and Familiarisation Booklet

You must complete this before taking up duties on board and after you have been given a guided safety tour of the vessel and a brief on its safety equipment, procedures and alarm signals.
This tour and brief will be the minimum information you require before taking up duties.  Further information will be found in this booklet.
 

Issued to:………………..………………………………..


Seaman’s Book Number:…………………………………


Date Issued:………………………………………………


Ship’s Name:……………………………………………..

This page must be signed and a copy (page attached) retained on board the vessel as evidence that the seafarer has received and understands the book and contents.
Personal – Safety and Familiarisation Booklet

You must complete this before taking up duties on board and after you have been given a guided safety tour of the vessel and a brief on its safety equipment, procedures and alarm signals.
This tour and brief will be the minimum information you require before taking up duties.  Further information will be found in this booklet.

Issued to:………………..………………………………..


Seaman’s Book Number:…………………………………


Date Issued:………………………………………………


Ship’s Name:……………………………………………..

1.  Introduction
  
The purpose of this record is to ensure, as far as possible, that each Officer and Rating has a sound and thorough knowledge of the health, safety, life-saving and pollution prevention equipment on board the vessel in which he is serving.

It is the duty of the seafarer to whom this record is issued, to ensure that the appropriate sections are completed and signed within the laid down time limits.

The Master of the vessel and the head of department will give all assistance in completing the required tasks, but it is the duty of the seafarer to acquire a complete knowledge of the vessel at the earliest opportunity. 

The safety of the vessel and her crew can only be assured by the constant alertness of all crew members. If at any time you see safety equipment which does not appear in good order, or any situation relating to safety which you do not fully understand, report this immediately to a senior officer.
  
2.  Carriage of Liquefied Gases by Sea

HOW ARE THEY CARRIED?

Gases are always liquefied for transportation in bulk – simply because more cargo can be fitted in a given volume. Typically, but dependent upon the product, 1 volume of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is equivalent to over 250 volumes of vapour and 1 volume of liquefied natural gas (LNG) equivalent to 600 volumes of vapour.

The same liquefied gas at the same temperature, in a closed container, will always have the same pressure. Therefore, butane at the same temperature has an identical pressure irrespective of whether the container is the tank of a gas carrier, a simple gas cigarette lighter, a storage tank, or a domestic gas bottle – All are pressurised containers.

  1. Reducing its temperature by refrigeration at atmospheric pressure.
  2. Applying pressure at ambient temperature.
  3. A combination of the above.
LNG is produced from natural gas. LPG may be produced either from natural gas or from refining crude oil.

In the year 2000 approximately 100 million tonnes of LNG and 50 million tonnes of LPG were shipped by sea.

TYPES OF LIQUEFIED GAS CARRIER

Gas carriers are designed for the cargoes that they have to carry and conditions under which they must carry them. A brief description of some of the main ship designs follows including cross-sections through tanks.

LNG Carriers

Liquefied Natural Gas is carried at about - 162ºC and most of these carriers are fitted with either the distinctive ‘spherical’ type cargo tanks or ‘membrane’ tanks. The tanks are heavily insulated to minimise boil-off. At present reliquefaction units are not normally fitted and boil-off gas is burnt as fuel gas to propel the ship. The majority of these ships are between 70,000 and 138,000 cubic metres capacity and are up to 300 metres in length.

LPG Carriers

  • Fully Pressurised
These are generally the smallest type of liquefied gas carrier afloat (up to about 5,000 cubic metre, although some are larger) and carry products at ambient temperatures in cylindrical or spherical steel pressure vessels designed to withstand pressures up to 20 bar. They are not fitted with reliquefaction plant and represent a simple cost-effective means of transporting LPG's and chemical gases to the smaller gas terminals.

  • Semi-Pressurised
Capable of carrying LPG, ammonia and the chemical gases these ships have a wide variety of capacities from a few thousand cubic metres up to about 20,000 cubic metres. They are generally fitted with cylindrical or bi-lobe pressure-vessel type cargo tanks, which are suitable for low-temperatures. The tanks may be specially shaped to fit the holds and maximise cargo carrying capacity. By constructing the tanks from special alloy steels the cargo may be carried at temperatures as low as -50ºC and at pressures from atmospheric to about 10 bar. The cargo tanks are insulated and reliquefaction plant is fitted for temperature control. These ships are able to load and discharge products at both pressurised and refrigerated storage facilities.

  •  Ethylene Carriers
Ethylene ships are a sophisticated type of semi-pressurised ship, designed to carry most liquefied gas cargoes except LNG.

They feature cylindrical or bi-lobe, insulated, stainless or low temperature nickel steel cargo tanks able to carry cargoes at minimum temperatures of -104ºC and at tank pressures of up to about 6 bar. The ships can load and discharge at virtually all pressurised and refrigerated terminals, making them the most versatile LPG carriers in terms of cargo handling ability. Powerful reliquefaction units are installed.

  • Fully Refrigerated
These ships carry product at near atmosphere pressure at temperatures, dependant upon the type of cargo, of between -5ºC and -55ºC. The prismatic, or box shaped, tanks are made from special low temperature steel and are heavily insulated. A secondary barrier is fitted to protect against leakage from the main tank. Hold spaces are inerted when carrying LPG’s to prevent a flammable atmosphere being created in the event of a leak. Powerful reliquefaction units are installed on these ships which generally range in size from 30,000 to 80,000 cubic metres.

INTRODUCTION

This booklet specifically addresses hazards associated with gas carriers and the cargoes they can carry.

It is helpful to understand the following terms:

  • Hazard – is the potential to cause harm
  • Risk – is the chance of harm
  • Risk Assessment – is an analysis of risk factors
  • Risk Mitigation – are the measures taken to reduce risk.

YOU MUST BE AWARE OF THE HAZARDS AND PRECAUTIONS

YOU MUST FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS

FAILURE TO DO SO MAY DAMAGE YOUR SHIP AND THE ENVIRONMENT AND COULD POSSIBLY KILL OR INJURE YOU AND YOUR COLLEAGUES
 
 FURTHER INFORMATION:

  • Cargo Data Sheets which should be placed on ships notice boards. They identify product characteristics, health data and emergency procedures for the cargo.
  • Company Procedures and Manuals which should be made available to you.
  • Liquefied Gas Handling Principles on Ships and in Terminals produced by SIGGTO and The Tanker Safety Guide (Liquefied Gas) produced by The International Chamber of Shipping both give detailed information about the safe operation of liquefied gas carriers and handling the cargoes that your ship may carry. These books should be available on board.
CARGO HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION

The information for each cargo grade being carried at any one time should include:

  • Appearance                                     
  • Reactivity data
  • Physical data
  • Fire and explosion data
  • Health data
  • Conditions of carriage
  • Special requirements
  • The main hazards
  • Associate hazards
  • Compatible materials
It is important to realise that different cargo grades may well have different hazards associated with them.

If any of the terms are unfamiliar to you refer to the definitions at the back of this booklet or ask an officer.

THE PRESENCE OF GAS

There is always the possibility of the presence of gas in the atmosphere, particularly:

  • During loading and discharging of liquefied gases
  • When the ship is gassing-up or being gas-freed
  • When a pipeline or cargo pump is opened up for maintenance
  • In compressor rooms
  • Within ballast tanks and void spaces and double bottom tanks adjacent to cargo tanks
 Dispersion of gas and vapours

  • LPG vapours are heavier than air
  • Ammonia (NH³) vapours are lighter than air
  • LNG vapours are lighter than air when warm, heavier when cold (below -100°C)


MANY CARGO VAPOURS ARE HEAVIER THAN AIR AND WILL ACCUMULATE IN BILGES AND OTHER LOW AREAS

AN AREA OR SPACE THAT IS CONSIDERED GAS-FREE FOR HOT WORK OR ENTRY SHOULD BE FREQUENTLY RE-TESTED
 
 
 In windy conditions vapour rapidly disperse (that is to say they dilute below LFL [Lower Flammable Limit] or TLV[Threshold Limit Value] ). Where there is little air movement, there is a greater danger of flammable or toxic mixtures accumulating and possibly being drawn into machinery spaces or the accommodation.

In still air conditions, flammable or toxic gases may accumulate in potentially hazardous areas. In the event of large accumulations of gas, cargo work will be stopped immediately until the vapour has dissipated and the hazard removed.

Under these circumstances you must:

  • Ensure all portholes and doors are closed
  • Carry out orders regarding ventilation openings and air intakes
  • Adhere to your ship’s rules and procedures
 SOURCES OF IGNITION

Matches & Lighters

  • Lighters are particularly dangerous – they may operate accidentally
  • Use only safety matches – other types are dangerous.
  • Never carry matches or lighters on deck or into the cargo area.
  • the captain will decide when and where smoking is allowed
  • obey all instructions about smoking
  • never smoke outside on the open deck
  • secret smoking is more dangerous than controlled smoking
  • never smoke in bed
Galley If cargo gases are likely to enter the galley the cooking equipment must be shutdown until the source has been located and the gas dispersed.

Engine Room There are many possible source of ignition in the engine room and gas carriers are designed to reduce the chances of gas entering these spaces. Doors are located away from the cargo are and ventilation fan intakes are positioned at high level. Entrances to the engine room must be kept shut at all times.

Most LNG carrier’s burn cargo boil-off as fuel for propulsion and they are specially designed to ensure this is undertaken safely.

Accommodation Cargo gases must be excluded from the accommodation areas and potential sources of ignition. All external doors and ports should be kept shut, especially during loading and discharging operations. As for the engine room, ventilation fans are high above the deck to prevent gas entering these spaces and intakes are fitted with closing devices. Some doors may be fitted with airlocks and it is essential that these are used correctly.

Torches and Portable Lighting Use only certified safety torches of an approved type which will be available on board your ship.
  
Hand-held Radios The use of an unapproved radio can be a source of ignition. Use only portable radios of an approved type that have a certification plate similar to that shown at the top of the next page.

Mobile Telephones Like unapproved hand-held radios mobile telephones are known to be capable of igniting flammable vapours. If dropped they may break open exposing the battery and electrical circuit.
  
3.  Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  1. Carriage of Liquefied Gases by Sea
  1. Table of Contents
  1. Alarm Signals, Life Saving Equipment and Fire Extinguishers
  1. Personal Safety Instructions
  1. Check Lists to Complete
  1. Health Safety and Environmental Policy
  1. Drugs and Alcohol Policy
  1. Security
  1. Designated Person Ashore
  1. On Board Organisation
  1. Action when Discovering a Fire
  1. Abandon Ship and Man Overboard
  1. Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing
  1. General First Aid
Shock          
Poisoning    
Bleeding
Heat Stroke
Frostbite

  1. House Keeping
Housekeeping
Hygiene Requirements
Catering Hygiene
Working in the Engine Room
Working on Deck

  1. Hazardous Work Operations
Company Policy covering hazardous work.

  1. Enclosed Space Entry Procedure
Company Policy covering enclosed space entry.

  1. Work Aloft Procedure
Company Policy covering working aloft    

  1. Cargo Hazardous Sheets
  1. Diagrams and Plans
Ships General Arrangement
Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zones
Lifeboats and Davits
Rescue Boat and Davit
Fire Fighting and Life Saving Appliance Distribution

  1. Further Useful Reading Material

4.  Alarm Signals, Life Saving Equipment and Fire Extinguishers

You should have been given a guided tour of the vessel for the purpose of orientation and familiarisation.  Additionally, you will need to know the alarm signals in use on board the vessel  and your muster station following any alarm.  This is the minimum amount of information you require before taking up duties.
  
ALARM SIGNALS ON BOARD
Enter the different alarms on board

OTHER ALARMS

Engine alarms are different to above alarms and apply specific crew members. However all crew members must be familiar with all alarm systems likely to be heard on board.

Enter the details of all other alarms on board.

COMPLETE THIS PAGE DURING THE FAMILIARISATION TOUR

SHIP SAFETY PARTICULARS

Ship Name:………………………………….     Call Sign:………………………………..

Type of Ship:………………………………..     Port of Registry:…………………………

Number of Persons Aboard:………………...     Year Built:……………………………….


ALARMS


FIRE ALARMS

Are alarm switches fitted in accommodation? ……………………………………………..


If not, how would you raise the alarm for fire?.....................................................................

………………………………………………………………………………………………

If yes, where is the nearest switch?                                        ………………………………


Where is the nearest alarm bell to your cabin?                       ……………………………...


TELEPHONES

Is an internal telephone system fitted?                                    .……………………………..

If not in your cabin, where is the nearest telephone?              ……………………………...

................................................................................................................................................

What is the number of the bridge?                                         ……………………………....

What is the number of Engine Control Room?                      ………………………………

  
COMPLETE THIS PAGE DURING FAMILIARISATION TOUR

LIFESAVING

LIFEBOATS                                         No. of Persons each can carry:     Stbd………….     Port……………

                                                                                                                                Aft…………….

LIFERAFTS                                         No. of Persons each can carry:     Stbd………….     Port…………...
                                                                               
                                                                                                                                Forward…………..

LIFEBUOYS                                        How many on board?                   …………………………………..

LIFEJACKETS                                    Where are spare lifejackets stowed?     ……………………………..

SURVIVAL SUITS                             Where is your survival suit stowed?      …………………………….


FIREFIGHTING

FIRE EXINGUISHERS

How many different types on board?   ...............................................................................

Is a fixed system fitted in accommodation?   …………………………………………….

If yes, what type of system?   …………………………………………………………….

If yes, what type of system?   …………………………………………………………….

Is fixed system fitted in engine room?   …………………………………………………..

If yes, what type of system?  ……………………………………………………………...

Is fixed system fitted in galley?  ………………………………………………………….

If yes, what type of system?    …………………………………………………………….

FIRE HOSES

Where is the hose, nearest to your cabin?   ………………………………………………...

BREATHING APPARATUS

Where is the unit, nearest to your cabin, stored?   …………………………………………

Where are other units stored?   ………………………………………………………….....

Have you used this equipment before?   …………………………………………………..

 5.  Personal Safety Instructions

 PERSONAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS

Most accidents onboard a ship is caused through CARELESSNESS!

It is your duty as a member of the ship’s crew to ensure that as far as possible you maintain clean, orderly and safe places of work and of living accommodation.

While the Master will from time to time inspect your living area and the public spaces, it is up to you to ensure that you keep these areas clean and tidy at all times.

NECESSARY PROTECTIVE CLOTHING is supplied b the vessel but must be looked after by you to make sure that such gear is always ready for use. It must be cleaned and dried regularly and stored in a safe place where you can find it at short notice.

The appropriate clothing, especially the safety and protective clothing supplied, must be worn at all times when at work.

SAFETY AWARENESS is the duty of every crewmember. Make a habit of checking any piece of lifesaving or fire fighting equipment you may pass when moving around the ship. If it appears not to be ready for immediate use, report the fact to a senior officer.

WORK HAZARDS include tools and equipment left lying around, cleaning materials not properly disposed, openings and machinery not properly guarded. Always work on the basis that you could be suddenly called away and do not leave anything that could be dangerous to you on returning to the job, to another person who might have to follow you on the job, or to any person entering or passing your place of work.
6.  Check Lists to Complete

ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED BEFORE SAILING


1. Check                                                                LIFEBOAT STATION                        Lifeboat No………………………..

2. Check                                                                LIFEBOAT LAUNCHING DUTY……………………………………..

3. Have you carried out this duty before?                                                                                      YES        NO

If NO, have you asked the Officer in charge to explain?                                            YES        NO

4. Check escape routes from your cabin and workplace to lifeboat station and
    Emergency muster station.                                                                                                            YES        NO

5. Check EMERGENCY MUSTER station                                                                                    YES        NO

6. Check EMERGENCY PARTY DUTY                                                                                        YES        NO

7. Have you carried out this duty before?                                                                                      YES        NO

8. Have you located the two FIRE EXTINGUISHERS nearest to your cabin?                      YES        NO

9. Have you used this type of extinguisher before?                                                                      YES        NO

10. Have you located the nearest FIRE ALRM to your cabin?                                                 YES        NO

11. Have you located the nearest internal telephone?                                                                 YES        NO

12. Have you checked your LIFEJACKET?                                                                                  YES        NO

13. Have you checked your SURVIVAL SUIT?                                                                           YES        NO


Seafarer:….............................................

Verified:………………...............                     Rank:………………………………


Master
Date/Time:………………………………………………..

ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED WITHIN 24 HOURS OF JOINING VESSEL

1. Have you found where spare lifejackets are stored?                                                                               YES        NO

2. Do you know where ALL life rafts are stored?                                                                          YES        NO

3. Have you checked the equipment that you personally will use at your
    EMERGENCY STATION?                                                                                                            YES        NO

4. Have you checked the position of ALL fire fighting equipment in the
    accommodation?                                                                                                                            YES        NO

5. Have you checked the position of ALL fire fighting equipment at your normal?
     place of work?

6. Have you checked the position of all FIRE ALARMS?                                                          YES        NO

7. Have you heard FIRE & GENERAL ALARMS tested?                                                          YES        NO

8. Have you checked where lifebuoys are stored?                                                                        YES        NO

9. Have you studied the LIFEBOAT & EMERGENCY STATION muster list?                      YES        NO

10. Have you checked where Oil Spill chemicals and clean up equipment
      are stored?                                                                                                                                      YES        NO


Seafarer:….............................................

Verified:………………...............                     Rank:………………………………


Master
Date/Time:………………………………………………..

  
ITEMS TO BE COMPLETED WITHIN 7 DAYS OF JOINING VESSEL

 1. Have you inspected your appointed lifeboat?                                                                          YES        NO

2. Does the lifeboat contain immersion suits?                                                                               YES        NO

3. If YES have you tried on an immersion suit?                                                                            YES        NO

4. Have you checked instructions on life rafts?                                                                            YES        NO

5. Have you checked where the FIRST AID and medical equipment
    is situated?                                                                                                                                        YES        NO

6. Could you find your way, in darkness, from your cabin and place?
    of work to the nearest exit to the deck?                                                                                      YES        NO

7. Have you read the operating instructions on ALL types of FIRE
    EXTINGUISHERS on board?                                                                                                      YES        NO

8. Have you read and signed the vessel SAFETY MANUAL situated
     in your mess room?                                                                                                                        YES        NO

9. Have you discussed with your Safety Officer or Head of Department
    any points on which you were uncertain or did not understand?                                           YES        NO

10. Do you know how and where to contact the duty officer at any hour
      of the day or night?                                                                                                                       YES        NO


Seafarer:….............................................

Verified:………………...............                     Rank:………………………………


Master
Date/Time:………………………………………………..

  
7.  Health Safety and Environmental Policy
  
The Company Health Safety and Environmental Policy must be inserted here.
8.  Drugs and Alcohol Policy
 The Company Drug and Alcohol Policy must be inserted here.
 The Company Drug & Alcohol  Verification Procedures must be shown here.

 9.  Security
 The Company Security Policy must be inserted here. 
10.  Designated Person Ashore


DESIGNATED PERSON

The purpose of the DPA function is:

  • To monitor the safety and environmental protection aspects of the ships operations.
  • To ensure that adequate resources and shore based support are available in order to ensure the safe operation of the ships.
  • To provide a link between those onboard and the shore support
 The DPA is to monitor the daily operations of the vessels by using the vessels’ routine reporting and other means to ensure that the safety of life, the environment and property is not compromised. If it becomes apparent that any of these areas might be compromised, the DPA will liaise with the vessel and shore support to ensure that all safety and environmental protection standards are fully met.

If the vessel’s staff feel that the safety of life, the environment or property is compromised due to particular circumstances, the DPA should be contacted in order to liaise with the vessel and with shore support to resolve the situation. The DPA may access the highest levels of management, where necessary, in order to ensure that resources are provided to resolve a situation.

The Designated Person is:  ……………………………………


The DPA can be contacted by Telephone: ……………………………


Or by e-mail: ………………………………….

11.  On Board Organisation
 Details of the individual ship board organisation and reporting lines to be shown here.
12.  Action when Discovering a Fire

FIRE PREVENTION

Special considerations in or around cargo spaces.

An explosion or outbreak of fire in or around cargo spaces represents a fatal risk for the ship and crew.
Special consideration and care must therefore be exercised in this regard, and following precautions taken:

  • In the cargo compartments where flammable gases are expected, strict elimination of all possible sources of ignition is essential.
  • The applicable safe working procedure shall be strictly adhered to, and great care should be exercised when handling cargo.
  • UHF/VHF portable transceivers shall be of an intrinsically safe type.
  • PORTABLE MOBILE PHONES shall not be used in hazardous areas.
  • Electrical equipment such as radios and calculators etc., are not permitted on a tank deck, or other areas where flammable gas may be encountered, unless approved for use in such areas.
  • Portable electric lamps, torches and other portable electrical equipment for use in or around cargo holds with flammable gases, liquids shall be of approved type
  • The use of portable equipment and flexible electrical cables (wandering leads) are prohibited within cargo spaces and adjacent areas, or over a tank deck, unless the area has been certified “SAFE”.
  • Care has to be taken when using “non-spark” tools in or around cargo tanks or areas with flammable gases, liquids or other flammable substances as such tools may create sparks if smeared with rust particles.
  • All electrical equipment in use shall be properly earthed and bonded prior to use.  Privately purchased electronic/electrical equipment for use in cabins to be inspected by the electrician and approved for use by the Master or Chief Engineer.
  • Signs prohibiting smoking, use of lighters, matches or open flame shall be posted onboard
  • Smoking regulation while in port and at sea shall be complied with.
General action when discovering a fire

Any crew member who discover or suspect a fire, shall

1. Raise the fire alarm, no matter how small the fire may be. (Remember that even a small fire may easily develop into a major problem).
2. Inform the duty officer about the situation, the information shall be brief and should contain the following:

  • Who is calling
  • Location of the fire
  • Extent of the fire
  • Observed casualties
  • Need for assistance
  • Initiated actions
3. Evacuate all personnel in the area if the development of the fire makes it necessary.
4. Try to combat the fire by using the proper fire extinguishers, blankets, clothing etc.
5. Prepare retreat.
6. If attempts to combat the fire are impossible, retreat and seal off the area by closing off all doors,           portholes, ventilation etc., in order to reduce the air supply to the scene of the fire.
13. Abandon Ship Procedure and Man Overboard

ABANDON SHIP

Abandonment of the ship, in order to protect the health and lives of the crew, shall only be initiated when no other possibilities are present or favourable.

Responsibility:

The Master is responsible for a decision to abandon ship, as well as for organising and co-ordinating all operations.

The Chief Officer is responsible for all preparations on deck, in compliance with the Master’s orders.

Action plan:

1. When the decision to abandon ship is made the Master shall:

·         Raise the general alarm. Time allowing, he shall gather the Crew and inform them regarding the situation and decisions made. This may give the Crew an opportunity to prepare mentally for the abandonment.
·         Transmit a distress signal and distress message on the proper emergency channels, including,:
·         Ship’s name and call letters
·         Position
·         Type of emergency
·         Injuries and missing persons
·         The number of survival crafts and survivors
·         Wind, wave and weather situation
·         Notify the Company

2. As soon as the Crew is mustered, Team Leaders shall:
·         Ensure that all personnel are present. If anyone is missing the Chief Officer shall immediately initiate search actions in order to locate and rescue the missing personnel, taking into consideration:
·         Where were they last seen
·         Possibilities and available time for searching
·         Probability that they may still be alive
·         Check that the personnel have sufficient clothing, and are wearing properly fastened life jackets

 3. The Chief Officer shall initiate the preparation of the lifeboat and/or the life rafts upon the Master’s orders, and supervise the operation.

He shall also ensure that the following equipment is collected and distributed:

·         Available radio equipment and emergency beacons.
·         Spare distress signals
·         Blankets and warm clothing
·         Survival suits
·         Medical Equipment
·         Additional food supply and fresh water

4. Conditions permitting, before leaving the ship the Master shall collect and bring the following important documents with him:

·         Log Book
·         Ship Certificates
·         The document containing information regarding the course of events
·         Confidential instructions
·         Crew passports

5. The Chief Officer shall initiate and supervise the embarking and launching of the lifeboats and/or life rafts.

6. The lifeboat(s) and life rafts shall only be launched upon the Master’s orders.

MAN OVERBOARD

Survival factors

If a man overboard situation occurs by accident or other circumstances, underway or during work operations on the ship sides etc. the possibility of survival depends upon the human and environmental factors, which include:

·         Height of fall
·         The person’s ability to swim
·         The person’s ability to resist hypothermia.
·         State of consciousness when hitting the water.
·         How rapid search actions are initiated and recovery executed.
·         Sea water temperature.
·         Strong currents.
·         Rapacious fish
·         Degree of pollution of water

The possibility for survival diminishes for every passing minute, especially in cold water. It is therefore important when a person is missing that rescue operations are initiated without delay.

Sea Temperature                                 Assumed survival time

Less than    2°C                                    Less than ¾ hour
         2°C -  5ºC                                     Less than 1.5 hour
        5°C - 10°C                                    Less than 3 hours
      10°C - 15°C                                    Less than 6 hours
      15°C - 20°C                                    Less than 12 hours
More than 20°C                                   Extended period of time, depending on psychological endurance.

Contingency plan

This contingency plan is available to describe the different situations which may occur, and the remedial actions to be executed.
  • At open sea.
  • At anchor
  • In port.
At open sea

1. Anybody witnessing a person falling overboard from a ship in open sea shall immediately initiate the
    following steps:

·         Throw a life buoy overboard, preferably one carrying light and smoke signal.
·         Notify the Duty Officer and inform about which side the person fell overboard.
·         More life buoys and other possible items shall be thrown overboard in order to indicate the direction back to the location of the accident.

2. Upon notification the Duty Officer shall:
·         Raise the alarm and post a lookout at a suitable place, equipped with binoculars, in order to keep the missing person within eyesight.
·         Make announcement on the vessel’s PA system and call the Master.
·         Release the life buoy with light/smoke signals on the bridge wing on the side from which the person fell overboard.
·         If there are other ship[s in the vicinity, notification regarding the situation and intended actions shall be transmitted to other ships in the vicinity. Flag “Oscar” (man over board) to be hoisted.
·         Put the main engine on “Standby” position and inform the engine room/Duty Engineer.

3. The Master shall upon his arrival on the bridge take over the command and be informed by the duty
    officer regarding the situation and action already taken.
·         Additional Lookouts shall be posted.
·         Other ships in the area as well as Rescue Centres shall be alerted regarding the emergency situation and required assistance, on their appropriate emergency channels.
·         Such information shall contain;
·         Time and position of the accident
·         Wind, weather and wave information
·         Manoeuvres in progress
·         Action initiated
·         Any useful additional information
·         The Chief Office is responsible for the preparation and launching of the designated lifeboat/M.O.B boat/rescue boat, as well as ensuring that the Members of the Rescue Team are wearing properly fitted survival suits.
·         A reliable communication between the bridge and the Rescue Team shall be established and portable communication equipment brought along in the rescue boat.
·         When the missing person is sighted the ship shall be manoeuvred so as to give the best possible position         for the rescue boat during the launching and rescue action.
·         The rescue boat is only to be launched on the Master’s order.


 At anchor or in port

·         Immediately upon seeing anybody falling overboard, while at anchor or in port, throw the nearest life buoy or any other floating device overboard and keep the person in sight as long as the conditions permits.
·         If the person in the water is within range of a life buoy with connecting line or a heaving line, this shall be used.
·         Call for assistance and notify the Duty Officer.
·         Lower the accommodation ladder or any other ladder capable of reaching the surface of the water.
·         The Duty Officer shall immediately upon notification raise the general alarm and inform the Master and Crew regarding the situation.
·         Preparation and launching of the designated lifeboat/M.O.B boat, shall take place as soon as possible, upon the Master’s orders and under the supervision of the Chief Officer.
·         Rescue stations and other ships in the area shall, if necessary, be alerted on their appropriate emergency channels, giving information regarding position, time of accident, current direction etc.

14.  Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing
 This should contain a general description on the quality and usage of the personal protective equipment provided on board.

15. General First Aid

GENERAL FIRST AID

Shock

Shock is caused by failing blood circulation and any injured person may lapse into shock.

Symptoms:
  • Fast heartbeat and pulse.
  • Pale cold and sweating skin.
  • Drowsiness and respiratory problems
Treatment:
  • Try to maintain normal body temperature and place the patient’s head 15-20 cm lower than the body unless a head injury is suspected.  If head injury exists keep the person level or head slightly elevated.
  • If the victim is unconscious arrange him/her in a stable side position.
Poisoning

Poisoning can be divided in three main groups, namely:
  • By gas or lack of oxygen
  • Internal poisoning by hazardous substances or liquids.
  • External poisoning by hazardous substances or liquids.
Symptoms:

Reduced mental activity and lack of concentration.

  • Increasing drowsiness, developing into unconsciousness.
  • Dizziness and/cramp cramp.
  • Changes in respiration or pulse rate.
  • Vomiting
  • Wounds or discoloration to the skin, (external poisoning).
Treatment for gas poisoning or lack of oxygen

  • Bring the patient out in the fresh air. Rescuers shall use breathing apparatuses if rescue is undertaken in dangerous atmospheres.
  • Release all tight fitting clothing
  • Initiate first aid, including artificial respiration and heart compression if the patient is unconscious and/or not breathing.
  • Supply oxygen or compressed air e.g. from breathing apparatus if/or as soon as the patient is breathing.
  • Keep the patient warm.
 Treatment for internal poisoning by hazardous substances or liquids

  • If the patient is unconscious, arrange him in a proper position, ensuring that the air tract is open. Keep the patient’s mouth cavity clean and initiate artificial respiration if he stops breathing.
  • Determine which substance or liquid may have caused the poisoning, taking into account whether it is corrosive or non-corrosive substance.
 Corroding substance

  • Supply the patient with lots of milk or water.
  • Never provoke vomiting.
 treatment for external poisoning by hazardous substances or liquids

  • Immediately flush the poisoned part of the body with fresh water.
  • Remove all contaminated clothing
  • Keep flushing for at least 20 min.
Bleeding

Treatment:
  • Lay the injured person down.
  • Try to keep the wounded part of the body above the level of the heart.
  • Press the edges of the wound together.
  • Maintain the pressure against the wound until you are able to apply a bandage.
 Heat stroke

Symptoms:
  • On set can be gradual or very sudden with delirium and unconsciousness, complete lack of the sweating mechanism.
  • The pulse will be feeble and the breathing shallow
  • The victim may vomit
Treatment
  • Immediate cooling of the patient to reduce body temperature
  • Replacement of fluids and salts.
 Frostbite

Symptoms
  • The skin becomes pale and yellowish white
  • Has a feeling of wooden hardness, the patch affected is clearly marked off from the rest of the area.
Treatment
  • Rapidly but gently, re-warm the area
  • Hot drinks and general body warmth maintained.

16. House Keeping

HOUSEKEEPING

Good housekeeping on board is essential and the main requirements are:
  • Keep all compartments, work areas and spaces clean and tidy.
  • Throw all oily wastes and rags into closed steel containers, (to be disposed of under controlled conditions).
  • Store paint and chemicals in designated room.
  • Store tools and equipment in proper storage areas when they are not in use.
  • Clean up any spills immediately
  • Keep all emergency exits and passageways clear at all times.
  • Tidy up work areas before leaving them.
  • Secure all loose items (books, laptop computers, etc.) against ships motions.
GENERAL HYGIENE REQUIREMENTS

High standards of hygiene shall at all times be maintained, including:
  • Regular washing of clothing (work/personal)
  • Heavily soiled working clothes shall be left in the lockers in the changing rooms, and be cleaned at the first opportunity.
  • Cabins shall at all times be kept clean and tidy
CATERING DEPT.

  • Working clothes, which are used by the galley staff, shall be kept clean at all times.
  • Be mindful of hand cleanliness and always wash your hands after visiting the toilet and prior to handling food.
  • Floors in the galley are to be kept clean of fat or other slippery material at all times.
  • No refuse, solid or liquid, shall be allowed to accumulate in the galley or food storage rooms. Garbage and refuse shall be disposed in a sanitary manner.
  • Dishes and cooking utensils shall be properly cleaned and sterilised after each use.
  • Dish cloths, towels etc. shall be changed daily.
  • During heavy weather conditions guard rails shall be used around the ovens in order to prevent pots and pans falling onto the floor. Ensure that hot cooking oil is secured.
  • Cutting and slicing machines shall be cleaned daily, take appropriate care when cleaning to prevent cuts,  i.e. turn off power while cleaning, use appropriate tools and gloves etc.
  • Emergency exits and fire-fighting appliances shall be kept unobstructed at all times.
ENGINE ROOM

  • Never start to operate machinery you are not familiar with.
  • Never try to remove metal turnings or filings when the machinery is running. Use a broom or rake, when the machinery is turned off.
  • When chipping or using the machines, goggles shall always be used.
  • If you are working aloft or on a stage, remember to use a safety harness and safety belt.
  • If the work requires floor plates to be removed, always use lifting handles. Do not try to open them by using your fingers.
  • Always keep free access to emergency exits and fire-fighting appliances.
  • Keep the engine room clean and tidy at all times; any oil spill shall be removed immediately.
  • Exercise extra care when working close to running machinery. Beware of loose clothing being entangled in rotating machinery.
  • Keep the fire preventive measures in mind at all times.
  • Familiarise with locations of EEBD apparatus.
  
DECK DEPT.

  • During mooring operations or when working with strained ropes or wires, always use hard hat, gloves and protective shoes.
  • NEVER STAND IN THE BIGHT OF A ROPE.
  • Moving mooring winches and windlasses shall always be manned and never be left unattended.
  • When working over the shipside, remember to wear a lifejacket and a safety harness. An attendant shall be present on deck to assist. Remember to ensure that staging ropes are properly fastened.
  • When chipping and or working with rust removers, heavy-duty detergents etc., safety goggles shall be used.
  • Remove any spills on deck immediately and keep it clean and tidy.
  • Never ignore a fire hazard.
  •  Prepare appropriate risk assessments and follow proper check lists for each activity:
·         Mooring/unmooring
·         Working aloft
·         Painting and other maintenance work
  
17.  Hazardous Work Procedures

The Company Policy on Hazardous Work Procedures to be inserted here.
18.  Enclosed Space Entry Procedure
  The Company Procedures on Enclosed Space Entry to be inserted here. 
19.   Work Aloft Procedures
  
The Company Procedures on Working Aloft  to be inserted here.
20.   Cargo Hazardous Sheets
  
Cargo data sheets for all likely cargoes to be included here
21.   Diagrams and Plans

It is suggested that copies of the following plans be scaled down and entered here:
  
·         Ships General Arrangement
·         Hazardous Areas and Gas Dangerous Zones
·         Lifeboats and Davits
·         Rescue Boat and Davits
·         Fire Fighting and Life saving Appliance Distribution.

 22.  Further Useful Reading Material
  
The following publications should be available on board and you should familiarise yourself with the contents.  

  1. Liquefied Gas Carriers – Your Personal Safety Guide [SIGTTO]
  1. Liquefied Gas Handling Principles On Ships and In Terminals [SIGTTO]
  1. International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals [OCIMF]
  1. International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk [IGC Code – IMO]
  1. Liquefied Gas Fire Hazard Management [SIGTTO]
  1. Crew Safety Standards and Training for Large LNG Carriers [SIGTTO]

  1. Ship Vetting and its Application to LNG [SIGTTO]

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